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High spatial and temporal resolution mapping of brain activity using flexible multiplexed electrode arrays with long term stability and safety

Description:

Flexible foldable actively multiplexed high density electrode array for mapping brain activity in-vivo

 

Inventor

Brian Litt, MD, Department of Neurology

 

Problem

Electrode arrays for recording and stimulating the brain are used throughout clinical medicine and basic neuroscience research, but are unable to sample large areas of the brain while maintaining high spatial resolution because of the need to individually wire each passive sensor at the electrode-tissue interface. 

 

Solution

New devices that integrate ultrathin and flexible silicon nanomembrane transistors into the electrode array, enabling new dense arrays of thousands of amplified and multiplexed sensors that are connected using fewer wires. An ultrathin 25 micrometer small double sided, silica based electrode array capable of collecting electrical signals from neural grooves. The data is collected rapidly and is of high spatial and temporal resolution. Use of biologically compatible components for the device ensures long term stability and safety.

  

Advantages

• The flexible BMI device is highly conductive, is 25 micro-meters in size, and consists of flexible silicon electrodes that pick up neural electrical signals during seizures.

• The multiplex transistor is made of quality single-crystal silicon and it connects all the electrodes through a single wire

• The device is encased in a polyimide cover to prevent electrical leakage

• The data recorded by the device has a high accuracy rate (64%) for experimental prediction

 

Applications

•  Stimulating the brain

•  Study of epileptic seizures

 

Stage of Development

•  The BMI device has been pre-tested in cats under the influence of the seizure inducing drug Picrotoxin

 

Intellectual Property

•  U.S. Patent 8,934,965

 

Reference Media

Viventi, et al. 2011. Nat Neurosci, 14(12):1599-605. Doi: 10.1038/nn.2973

 

Desired partnerships

•  License

Collaboration